TINY! Dragons, etc

TINY! DRAGONS, WYRMS AND SERPENTS

Sunday 17th July 2016

11am – 4pm

Pavilion Gardens, Buxton

find us near the younger children’s play area

Tiny-dragon
Another Tiny! event. Join us to fill the Gardens with dragons, medieval wyrms and wonderful serpents – none of them bigger than your hand (or maybe a wriggle as long as your arm). Stone and Water has been doing Tiny! days for several years now as part of Buxton Festival Fringe. There have been Tiny! Pirates (they send their regrets but they can’t join us this year as they are off plundering a garden pond somewhere (they are, after all, very small pirates)), fairies, goblins and trolls, knights and princesses, a lantern procession…

Join us under the trees to make your own Tiny! Creature: a cheerful, quiet, restful place within the wider activity of Pavilion Gardens. Step into a creative moment and find your own inner dragon – or outer Wyrm, or simply flappy monster….

When: 2 sessions: 11am – 1pm, 2pm – 4pm,  free: no booking, tickets or anything like that. Just turn up and join in

Where: Pavilion Gardens, Buxton

Fringe logo.18

 

 

REPORT ON THIS EVENT CAN BE FOUND HERE

a dragon soars across Pavilion Gardens, 17th July 2016

a dragon soars across Pavilion Gardens, 17th July 2016

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Bone Detectives, 1

Bone Detectives 1

The secrets of the skulls

Buxton Museum and Art gallery, 12th March 2016

Low-BD1

There were skulls, and some more skulls, and a Victorian Engineer’s cabinet of little bits of things and a decoupage box of seashells and then a box of mystery skulls….There was laughter and drawing and attempts to have big sisters/little brothers eaten…and there is more to come

a shell that went round and round, and the drawing that did the same

a shell that went round and round, and the drawing that did the same

see the foot of the page...

see the foot of the page…

the buffalo skull was very popular

the buffalo skull was very popular

Wednesday 16th March: Bone Detectives, 2:at Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Terrace Rd, Buxton, SK17 6DA, Tel: 01629 533540. 1 session: 10am – 1pm

This is a free session with activities and delivery aimed more at adults or young people of secondary school age

Again, this workshop is free and visitors are welcome to drop in. We recommend allowing an hour to work through activities but you are welcome to come for longer and spend more time handling, drawing and talking about the bones, skulls and shells we will have on display

Visitors are welcome to bring their own clean mystery finds with them – with no guarantee that we’ll be able to solve the mystery but have confidence that we will be enthusiastic about them!

Our wonderful friends in the community group Stone and Water have achieved a grant from BSW towards the community participation in these events and to cover the costs of a similar session with a youth group. In fact, we’ve got 2 – so a local WATCH group is going to be going all skeletal and what will happen to Taxal Scouts, I almost dread to think.

deeply involved

deeply involved

These events are supported by British Science Week and are also part of Buxton Museum’s Collections in the Landscape project

That drawing: australopithecus skulls, sheep skull, the bear in the corner of the gallery, some scared people…and a landrover…you can sort the story out yourself!

skulls, packed, a mug of tea and a stray chamaeleon bone...

skulls, packed, a mug of tea and a stray chamaeleon bone…

BSW2016RGBMID_BBLUE

Owls, flowers and waterfalls

Owls, flowers and waterfalls

a relief-printing workshop in Dovedale

with Maria Strutz

Sunday 17th May 2015

10am – 4pm

Maria's owl  

drawing inspiration from the beautiful Upper Dove Valley,

spend a day experimenting with techniques,

and take home your own finished prints

  • Free, materials provided
  • Provided as training for adults looking to extend their own skills
  • Venue: Dove Valley Centre
  • please bring food to share for lunch
  • no experience needed!

10949773_10152505951276829_51327946_n 

Spaces are limited, booking is needed, so grab your place: stoneandwater@btinternet.com

or call 07791 096857

 

More details sent with confirmation

sketch, scribble, draw, lino-cut, easi-print,

paint, stamp and mess!

Lowest primroses

HI_AWARDS_RGB

Well-wooded words: a Buxton poetry trail

Well-wooded Words

Grinlow Woods, a place for inspiration

Grinlow Woods, a place for inspiration

18th 19th July 2015

a poetry trail through Grinlow Woods 

during Buxton Arts Festival

an exquisite moment from last year's Art Trail

an exquisite moment from last year’s Art Trail

weaving words through trees and bushes,

poems through the flowers,

inviting visitors to wonder as they wander

to enjoy the richness of the woods

and the beauty of stone

and to touch the emotional heart of their summer

Grinlow 1In a companion trail to this year’s Grinlow Art And Storytelling Trail, we are inviting poets, scribblers, scrawlers and storywriters to submit pieces for a trail of words and wonders through Grinlow Woods
The Art Trail and its attendant activities were a great success last year, so we thought it would be good to add another strand to that creative woodland experience.
“We” are Stone and Water, the Buxton-based community group who celebrate the richness and creativity of the Peaks through projects like Exploring With Stories and Ancient Landscapes.
We are looking for pieces (poems or prose) that might

  • draw their inspiration from Buxton and the Peak District
  • provoke reflection about the area
  • use these landscapes to challenge reader’s own perceptions of themselves
  • or something like that

So we invite you to share your enjoyment, your passions, your delights and your despairs of, from or about the Peaks and send us your words for the Grinlow Poetry Trail

Poole's 1

our Trail won’t venture into the caves but your poetry might

FINE DETAILS (and some small print)

What will be happening

On the weekend of the Art Trail (18, 19 July 2015), our poems and stories will be laminated and presented through Grinlow Woods in Buxton Country Park. The Poetry Trail will follow a similar route to the Art Trail (see below). There will also, hopefully, be storytellers performing, poetry/writing workshops, make your own woodland book activities and perhaps some poetry readings (let us know if you’d like to be involved in that)
Our trail will have its own map and possibly a booklet (available to buy) of all our juicy poems and stories

How long a piece can you submit?

We are allocating each writer the equivalent of 2 sides of A4 (so please, no monstrous tomes or Homeric epics!) and in a largish font, maybe 20pt, for ease of reading. If you’re not sure, just send your piece in and we’ll advise. Of course you don’t need to send in that much: if you compose precise and elegant single haiku or tanka, maybe just one will say exactly what you want. At the moment, we will only accept one submission (ie one longer piece or several short poems) from each poet. If space arises we might invite more contributions from existing Trailers

Where will the poems be?

The Trail will wend its way up through Grinlow Woods from the Visitor Centre car park towards Solomon Temple (but will probably stop just short of the upper edge of the woods)

Until we see what is coming in, we can’t say where pieces will go. if you have a piece that definitely needs to be displayed by rocks, or a park bench or an oak tree, say, let us know

Beech-sky-poetry
Complementing the Art Trail

Our poetry trail will run along a similar route to the Art Trail. Poems do not need to associate with artworks unless you want them to. We don’t really know what other art is going up until the last minute so we cannot advise you of what’s going to be around. If you know an exhibiting artist, why not scheme wildly with them, keep us in the loop, and it might all be wonderful when we display words and visuals together

Filthy Lucre

We are not planning this as a money-making activity but we would like to generate enough cash to design and print Poetry Trail maps and maybe produce that booklet of poems for sale. We are asking for a contribution of £10 for each submission (ie for each poet’s contribution not for each individual poem). Don’t send any money with your submission. We’ll contact you about money and other fine tuning when your contribution is accepted

Being organised and officious

And we’re sorry to say this but there will need to be a bit of editorial control here: please don’t send in anything offensive, or discriminatory. Our boundaries are very flexible but there are limits and we will reserve the right to simply say “no”. We’ll try not to, but that reservation needs to be there

First deadline: we need to have a working set of poems by 31st March 2015: enough for us to know the plan is viable

Second deadline: assuming we get enough poems to make the Poetry Trail viable, we’ll go on taking new submissions until the end of May

Submissions:

email your work to

Gordon MacLellan: stoneandwater@btinternet.com

Please send it as an attachment in Word or Text

Make sure: your name and contact details are also on the attachment

By post: to  Creeping Toad, 51-d West Road, Buxton, SK17 6HQ
and we’ll be in touch!

So! flex those fingers, ink up those quills, charge up your keyboards,

knot your strings and carve your runes

invite an adventure into the green

invite an adventure into the green

The Lost Castles of….

The Lost Castles of Cheadle and Leek

Ruin

Cheadle Library

Tuesday 17th Feb 2015 

~

Leek Library

Friday 20th Feb 2015

We have two lively days coming up. The same details apply to both so they are presented together here….

Times:Pop-up Castle 1

morning: 10 – 12

afternoon 1 – 3

What are we doing?

Join artists from Stone and Water to design and make your own pop-up castle, or palace or wild witch’s house – and make some puppet people to live in them!

Cost:

These events are free. Materials are provided.

Who can join in?

The activity is suitable for 8s and overs (that includes grown-ups). Younger children are welcome but please bring a grown-up with you!

Pop-up castle 2

Space in both libraries is limited so it might be worth giving the relevant library a call and booking a space

Contact details and directions:

Tuesday: Cheadle Library

Friday: Leek Library

A Tiny! Wildness

TINY WILDNESS

ready for action

ready for action

Sunday 13th July 2014

Pavilion Gardens, Buxton

The return of Tiny! things

sunshine, concentration and creativity

sunshine, concentration and creativity

Nothing in the Tiny! world is very big. We aim to make things no bigger than a child’s hand (dragons tend to be a bit of an exception but one doesn’t argue with a wyrm) and we laugh, and play and draw and invent stories and send people away brandishing dragons, and princesses, and cats, and bats, and characters from Minecraft…..

The Tiny! workshops are a Stone and Water contribution to Buxton Festival Fringe’s “for families” section. The events are free, open to anyone (you don’t need to bring a family, just to remember that we’re all part of one) and rather silly. Our artists don’t get paid for these sessions – they are part of what we give back to this town that joins in with our knitting of ancient landscapes, our exploring with stories and, a while ago now went parading In Pursuit of Love and Passion

the cardboard scenery was a great base for spontaneous stories to evolve

the cardboard scenery was a great base for spontaneous stories to evolve

This was our fifth year of Tiny! workshops and, despite a damp start, one of the nicest, with some 60 people joining us through the day.

small bird, long time colouring

small bird, long time colouring

Festival Fringe Review, Sunday 13th July 2014

Today I tore myself away from the armada of orange that was Fringe Sunday, and crossed the river from the bandstand in the Pavilion Gardens to find the stone & water crew with their latest Tiny! workshop.

As last year’s ‘For Families’ award winners, the imaginative Tiny! workshops have been Fringe staples for the past five years, so I knew I was in for a treat. It was lovely to see them back again with yet more creative ideas to enthrall and inspire all ages.

Perched like pixies or goblins beneath a tree with boxes of material, paper and pens, stone & water invited children to unleash their inner artist and create an array of colourful paper finger puppets. The children didn’t disappoint, coming up with a host of tiny characters including princesses, dragons, bats, pterodactyls, butterflies, robots and more, and that was just during the hour I spent there.

I visited the workshop with my two small cousins. One very patiently worked hard concentrating quietly on a carefully coloured bird while her older sister prolifically produced a whole cast of finger characters ready to be brought to life against the sets provided. A cottage, castle, tower and forest became the backdrop to complicated epic tales of battles, dragons, weddings and captured princesses performed by the children and their new creations.

The artists were on hand with practical and artistic help, whilst never patronising the young artists they were working with. The workshop proved totally absorbing, especially for the very young who seemed entranced at the fantasy world they were creating, and very proud of their finger puppets.

Gordon (aka Toad) said “we’re not trying to do anything big or complicated”, but the (tiny) event captured children and parents alike, proving that things don’t need to be big to be important, and that simple is often best. The playful workshop was a perfect time out from summer madness and rushing around, providing a much needed quiet break in the shade, with an added touch of magic and mystery.

Annie Osborne

a Tiny! Dragon

a Tiny! Dragon

dragons tend to get stuck in doorways

dragons tend to get stuck in doorways

 

Draw your own Trilobite!

an imagined low tide moment....

an imagined low tide moment….

As our Ancient Landscape project tides run out quietly, we thought we would keep ideas and activities going out there in the wider ancient seas of everyone else’s lives.

 

We are going to produce several activity blogs to encourage you to explore fossil worlds creatively!

 

Drawing trilobites

This might seem silly but we’ve found this little activity a useful one to encourage people to really look at and examine their fossils closely. The apttern given here is for a very general trilobite. There are so many different types that your personal one might be a very different shape. We suggest trying this pattern to give you a good sense of trilobitedness and confidence in your pencils. Then look at other trilobites and think about how proportions change….

 

Tril-11. Draw a cross: if the main line is 3 units long, put the crosspiece at 1 unit with arms of 1 unti each. Make a mark at the halfway point

 

2. Draw an oval using the tips of the cross as guide

Tril-2

3. Trilobite details

Tril-2 1head: use the tips of cross-piece as guides for the curve of your trilobite’s head and that crosspiece or the half way point as a guide for the back edge of the cephalon (trilobite head)

 

4. Draw in segments across the thorax – 10 is a good number but on smaller drawing slook crowded 9xercise some artistic license). Look at the symmetry and try to make that what you do on one side you also do on the other

 

5. Trilobite features: head shield is a cephalon, middle bit: thorax, tail pygidium. Trilobite bean-shaped eyes are compound (lots of small facets)

Underneath: lots of legs and gills

Tril-2 3

6. And just how colourful was a trilobite? Who knows? We do know that on our workshops, groups of Rainbow Trilobites often appear. The originals were probably – possibly – maybe – shades of grey or, like some modern crustaceans, they might have been reds and purples or coloured to suit their preferred habitats….

 

Developments: try adjusting the intial cross to get a trilobite from different angles. Once you feel confident with quick drawings of these trilobites start shifting the proportions to extend those side spines on the head (look at Fallotaspis and others)

Trilobite fingers

Fingerpuppet trilobites

These can start with either a drawing like the one above or half a drawing, drawn onto a piece of folded card with the fold corresponding to the main line of the cross

Tril-4 1

Cut it out, cut a line in from the edge to the side of the eye (the longer the better usually). Fold thecephalon along this line, folding front over the sides. Staple in place. This will pull the head into a nice curve and the original fold will help shape the rest of the animal.

 

Tril-4 2Add a ring of card to the underside, slide the puppet onto your finger and off you go! (Why not make one for every finger and have a family of them?)

Tril-4

Other models: the Australian Geological Survey Association do a lovely trilobite model printout. Trilobite sheet: