Make, take, play, laugh…spring activities coming up

Time To Make And Draw

activities for a strange Spring

make your own fingermouse

With all our planned events for the next few weeks cancelled, we are planning on posting some d-i-y activities to help keep your creativity going at home. To do this, we’re teaming up with Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Creeping Toad, the Babbling Vagabonds and the Green Man Gallery so that between us there will be something for you to experiment with every few days (I am reluctant to say “every day”). On this blog we’ll psot liks to other people’s activites as they appear as well as posting our own activities so keep an eye on things here as  launching-off point to flap your wings and fly off to other people’s sites

If you make anything inspried by one of these sessions, we’d love to see (or hear) your results so maybe send us a picture – either through facebook (find us at https://www.facebook.com/stoneandwater/) or email us at stoneandwater@btinternet.com

And for today, why not try:

Creeping Toad’s A Fingerful of Animals

or

Babbling Vagabonds wobble monster

or

Buxton Museum and Art Gallery’s underwater colouring sheet

add some extra kelp to the museum sheet perhaps – or draw your own?

Light in a winter darkness

This gallery contains 9 photos.

Winter Lights 18, 19 January 2020   This weekend saw two gentle events in Buxton Museum and Art Gallery and in the Cavendish Arcade as part of our “A Year in Our Town” project. Recycling plastic bottles (or odd bits of plastic and plastic cups), we made either small lanterns, tiny lanterns (think of the […]

Winter lights, public event

Winter Lights

“drive the cold winter away”

free events in Buxton

bottle lanterns on a dark night….

a lantern full of fish…

1. Saturday 18th January

Buxton Museum and Art Gallery

1 – 4pm

Terrace Rd, Buxton, SK17 6DA

2. Sunday 19th January

Cavendish Arcade, Buxton,

12 – 3pm

Terrace Rd, Buxton, SK17 6BQ

 

 

Winter Lights

“… a little light to drive the cold winter away”

a window panel

As the New Year begins and January feels long and cold and dark, why not join us at a session to celebrate the promise of a returning spring and make your own little lantern to light a window sill

 

We’ll be recycling old plastic bottles (so bring one or two along if you have some) into delicate lanterns or making laminated pictures of wintry scenes to sit in a window

 

  • No tickets or booking needed – just come along and join in (allow at least 30 minutes for making)
  • Free
  • Materials provided
  • Children under 8 years need to bring an adult

This event is one of the Year In Our Town events organised by Stone and Water. There will be at least one event a month through to June so keep an eye here, on the Creeping Toad blog or on our facebook page “Stone and Water”

The Lost Beasts of Buxton

what beast would you become?

The Lost Beasts of Buxton

make a mask, a hat, a monster

1 – 4pm, Saturday 29th June

Buxton Museum and Art Gallery

 

Make a carnival mask or hat inspired by our very own sabre-tooth cats, cave lions, wild horses and mammoths.

Once upon a time, and not so long ago, there were wolves in the Peak District hills, wild boars in the woods and beavers in the rivers. Once there were wild ponies here, and cave lions, reindeer and bears. There were scimitar-toothed cats and straight-tusked elephants. Before that, long and longer ago, there were strange sharks swimming in ancient limestone seas.

What wonderful animal would you celebrate?

You might make something that lives here now, something that lived here once or even something that really should have lived here (unicorns, maybe?)

 

are you a colourful shark person perhaps?

This event is free, no booking or tickets needed. Children under 7 should bring a grown-up with them and you need to allow 45 minutes to make an animal hat

Venue:

Buxton Museum and Art Gallery

Terrace Rd

Buxton

SK17 6DA

 

Celebrate the ancient animals of the Peaks and join Two Left Hands in the Buxton Carnival Parade on Saturday July 13th. Check the Two Left Hands facebook page for parade details and meeting points: Two Left Hands.

2LH at Buxton Carnival, 2018

This is the first event in our new “A Year In Our Town” project. We are aiming to have at least one event a month that will encourage people to find out more, explore and celebrate Buxton and the High Peak

Look out for the next events!

 

Lost Beasts is a Stone and Water event in partnerhsip with Buxton Museum and Art Gallery and Creeping Toad

 

Rock guitar and apples….

Apple Day

Dove Valley Centre,

14th October 2018

early for apples maybe…

An applyfish, not to be trifled with

Small feet flapping on a tablecloth,

small hands wave with fruity good cheer,

an angel flutters wings

and a strawberry fish and an Appllyfish* swam together through the waters of the Dove….

 

This was a Creeping Toad event for Stone and Water, I do hope no-one was expecting sensible….

 

There was a musician, a musical apple, who couldn’t play but who could hold his guitar and head bang dramatically……

 

We were at Apple Day at the Dove Valley Centre. A celebration of old orchards and new trees, a wonder of cakes and apple juices. Apple Days are almost always lovely events. This one was wet. Very wet and very cheerful with about 80 people over the afternoon coming to taste and test apple cakes, sip apple juice and help crush the apples that arrived in bags and boxes and baskets from trees across the Moorlands and the High Peak.

 

Quietly, there was also a chance to think “owl”, to watch images, to talk about help and listen to their stories, to see what any of us could do to support these beautiful, mysterious ghosts of field, meadow and open moor

 

And I was there to tell stories and lead people astray…so we did

 

There will be some film of our assorted puppets posted shortly

 

the strawberry fish, very rare, very wiggly

Apple Rock Star, one day

 

(* like a jellyfish but freshwater and probably tastier)

 

This event was a combined one with partners including Stone and Water’s Summer Excitements! project and Buxton Museum and Art Gallery’s BM125 project

The next Summer Excitements! activity will be posted on this blog soon

The next BM125 activity will appear on the Creeping Toad and Buxtom Museum pages soon

a sea of grasshopper sound

sinking into a sea of grasshopper sound

National Meadows Day

6th July 2018

National Meadow Day (Saturday 6th July) found the Stone and Water team loitering in the dry but beautiful meadows of the Upper Dove Valley, revelling in the sweep of grass, sudden flutters of butterflies and swallows flickering overhead. In a partnership with with the Dove Valley Centre, South West Peak’s Glorious Grasslands project and Buxton Museum and Art Gallery’s BM125 project, our Summer Excitements! project got off to a hot and flowery start

During the day, there were meadow walks and river dipping, insect drawing and book-building, time to talk and sit and enjoy the atmosphere of an ancient meadow under the wide skies in that peaceful valley.

Our Summer Excitements! project will see events running through the South West Peak area. Other event themes will include old buildings, local wildlife and the value of picnics. Other Excitements! events can be found here

Meadows are part of our agricultural heritage as much as any old farm tools or buildings or ancient farmers. Their use, management, decline and recognition reflect our own awareness of the importance of our agricultural landscapes. You may find old scythes and seed drills in a museum, you may even find a toothless ol’ farmhand, but a meadow needs the earth beneath its roots and the weather that ruffles the grasses. You won’t find a meadow in a museum and they cannot be collected. They can be protected, grown and valued as places where history, culture and wildlife coincide. As well as experiencing the meadow for themselves we invited visitors to think, reflect and record their thoughts about the importance of such places both to themselves as individuals and within the landscape.

Those reflections became lines within a poem growing out of a hot, dusty afternoon among the grass stalks…..

 

 

We sink
Into a field rustling and bustling with life,
Into the froth of grass,
Into a sea of grasshopper sound,
A dream where nothing changes.
The cows sleeping under a willow
Have been resting there for centuries.

trees hold the edge of the meadow

Memories are rooted in these meadows,
In the fleeting lives of butterflies,
In nodding seedheads,
In thistledown drifting on a hot breeze.
Farms, families, paths, tools and stories,
All knitted to the earth as tightly as the turf.
Childhood holidays rooted here too,
New names, first meetings,
Stonechats, curlews, those grasshoppers again.

The rhythm of a scythe echoes across centuries
They walked where we walk,
Those old farmers on a summer day,
The slice and hiss of a blade and
The whetstone that hones the edge,
Finding shade under these same trees,
Cutting the waving grass from the same sward.

Harebell and cranesbill
Selfheal and tormentil,
Scabious and burnet,
The names are an enchantment
A spell for a meadow,
Whispered on a dusty wind
Colour, scent, pollen and promise,

Foxtail, cocksfoot,
Fescue, vernal and bent
The rooted and the free
Meadow brown and large white
Ringlet and tortoiseshell,
Prayers between earth and sky.

Futures are rooted in this rare and ancient place,
Still growing memories
Having fun in the river, catching insects,
A diving beetle!

Knapweed and burnet nod purple heads
Studding the rippling ribbons of colour
Black medick nods, yellow heads in the hot dry grass.
Seeds of the future in a rare and ancient place,
Lose the meadow and the memories wither too,
The cows across the field will sleep only in the present.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNIPPETS
And here is a set of small pieces that didn’t quite fit into the larger poem

1. Bumblebees embroider the meadow
Knotting threads with flight paths
Charting by pollen, by nectar, colour coding
Scent-coding, the maps of their lives.

2. Yellow rattle whispers,
Dry and sandy,
Small bones in a bag,
A snake’s angry warning.

3. Bony fingers in the tops of the ash trees
Point a warning to the future

4. Falling sky splinters
Into scabious and cornflower blue,
While tormentil nestles in the grass,
Droplets of sunshine on the green

5. The promise of memories to grow with the hay
The dread of fields empty of hope

 

With many thanks to all our hay meadow artists and poets

and our partners on this rewarding day

Stone and Water thanks South West Peak

and The Bingham Trust for their support

A Bronze Day

Bronze Age Technology

Saturday 4th or Sunday 5th March 2017

Dove Valley Centre, Longnor

Bronze dagger in Buxton Museum

The ability to work bronze changed our world 3,000 years ago. It took an edge and held it, finer and sharper than flint that chipped or chert that cracked. Bronze offered a new blade, a different weight, a certain shining glamour. Working bronze set us on a path that led to iron and eventually, well, us!

Upper Dove Valley - no snow for us we hope!

Upper Dove Valley – no snow for us we hope!

As part of the Collections in the Landscape Project, Buxton Museum has been working with ancient technology specialist James Dilley to review Stone and Bronze Age collections. James has done various public events with the museum but now we are offering an intensive day exploring those Bronze Age technologies. Under James’ expert guidance, participants will work with moulds, a charcoal furnace, bronze and copper and bellows to make their own bronze artefact to take home

  • tools, materials and protective equipment will be provided
  • this is a 1 day workshop repeated on the Sunday
  • participants must be 16 years of age or older
  • £50 per person includes lunch – advanced booking is essential
  • to book: call the museum on 01629 533540 during office hours
  • directions and further details sent nearer the time

Another March event:
Exploring Ancient Landscapes: a walk through time
Saturday 25th March 2017

(this event was published in the blog “Walking through time”)

Have you ever wondered what the grassy lumps in the field are, why the field hedge is where it is or what that old building was used for? Archaeologist and heritage interpreter Bill Bevan will help you identify and understand the clues from our past that survive in the landscape. The Hope Valley between Castleton and Hope is an excellent place to find these remains of the past. the day will begin by looking at historic maps before walking and talking in the landscape itself on a circular walk between the two villages.

Please note, the Museum is closed for redevelopment until May 2017

Dove Valley Centre

Dove Valley Centre