A Bronze Day

Bronze Age Technology

Saturday 4th or Sunday 5th March 2017

Dove Valley Centre, Longnor

Bronze dagger in Buxton Museum

The ability to work bronze changed our world 3,000 years ago. It took an edge and held it, finer and sharper than flint that chipped or chert that cracked. Bronze offered a new blade, a different weight, a certain shining glamour. Working bronze set us on a path that led to iron and eventually, well, us!

Upper Dove Valley - no snow for us we hope!

Upper Dove Valley – no snow for us we hope!

As part of the Collections in the Landscape Project, Buxton Museum has been working with ancient technology specialist James Dilley to review Stone and Bronze Age collections. James has done various public events with the museum but now we are offering an intensive day exploring those Bronze Age technologies. Under James’ expert guidance, participants will work with moulds, a charcoal furnace, bronze and copper and bellows to make their own bronze artefact to take home

  • tools, materials and protective equipment will be provided
  • this is a 1 day workshop repeated on the Sunday
  • participants must be 16 years of age or older
  • £50 per person includes lunch – advanced booking is essential
  • to book: call the museum on 01629 533540 during office hours
  • directions and further details sent nearer the time

Another March event:
Exploring Ancient Landscapes: a walk through time
Saturday 25th March 2017

(this event was published in the blog “Walking through time”)

Have you ever wondered what the grassy lumps in the field are, why the field hedge is where it is or what that old building was used for? Archaeologist and heritage interpreter Bill Bevan will help you identify and understand the clues from our past that survive in the landscape. The Hope Valley between Castleton and Hope is an excellent place to find these remains of the past. the day will begin by looking at historic maps before walking and talking in the landscape itself on a circular walk between the two villages.

Please note, the Museum is closed for redevelopment until May 2017

Dove Valley Centre

Dove Valley Centre

The end of the bones

Bone Detectives

for British Science Week

12th – 20th March 2016

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There were bones, and teeth, there were skulls and even the fragmented paw of a cave lion. And there was time to look, to handle , turn over, touch, test a fingertip against a crocodile’s tooth.

the buffalo skull was very popular

the buffalo skull was very popular

Time to talk, wonder, ask and ask again and say, “No!” and “What’s a hyrax?” and

“This is a porpoise?”

“Where is the elephant’s trunk?”

“Can I pick this up? Oh. Can I pick that up? Good”

 

There were beautiful replica skulls for the slightly squeamish and gloves for the bolder – or for anyone who just wanted to look sort-of-scientific like they were on some police procedural drama

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For British Science Week, in a collaboration between Stone and Water, Buxton Museum’s Collections in the Landscape project and Creeping Toad, we ran a series of “Bone Detectives” workshops. These set out to introduce people to some basic skull features to look for and understand the clues they can give us about the original animal. The thought was that this would encourage people to look – to really open their eyes when they are out or maybe even to set off and do the hopeful walk they wouldn’t have done before

 

Skulls, skeletons or bits often turn up on walks over the moors of the Peak District, or perhaps are found by someone strolling in a casually acquisitive manner along a beach. We were looking for the questions (and their answers) that would set some inspired investigation in motion. We concentrated mostly on British mammal skulls – given time and the scope of vertebrate anatomy we had to draw some lines somewhere. But there were extension opportunities and as confidence grew, participants could move onto British bird skulls, a few exotic extras – a crocodile, assorted horns, replica hyrax, lynx and wallaby and a wide selection of shells including a spread of annoying cone shells (this one? That one? No, the other one? Why would you call something a geographical cone, for goodness sake”. There was even a d-i-y snake spine

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The workshops were a delight: from keenly questioning WATCH members to the surprise of casual visitors, workshops invite participation and challenged preconceptions. “But it’s so small! “ (same comment applied to rabbit, rat and squirrel skulls). People brought their own puzzles with them: beautfully delicate mouse and hedgehog skulls, a mysterious jaw bone (probably sheep), the museum added some mind-boggling teeth: woolly rhino and hyena.

 

The very bold in the museum went off to find the cave bear skull

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We were pleased: these were sessions that maybe didn’t get quite the quiet, dedicated concentration we had imagined but they were sessions that got people handling material, talking, asking questions, feeling more confident.

 

Sources:

Just to be clear, the skulls and shells we sued were all found materials or were already in established collections. Nothing was killed for the sake of this project

 

Reproduction skulls came from a wonderful online shop: CrimsonRichDesire

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Bone Detectives, 1

Bone Detectives 1

The secrets of the skulls

Buxton Museum and Art gallery, 12th March 2016

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There were skulls, and some more skulls, and a Victorian Engineer’s cabinet of little bits of things and a decoupage box of seashells and then a box of mystery skulls….There was laughter and drawing and attempts to have big sisters/little brothers eaten…and there is more to come

a shell that went round and round, and the drawing that did the same

a shell that went round and round, and the drawing that did the same

see the foot of the page...

see the foot of the page…

the buffalo skull was very popular

the buffalo skull was very popular

Wednesday 16th March: Bone Detectives, 2:at Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Terrace Rd, Buxton, SK17 6DA, Tel: 01629 533540. 1 session: 10am – 1pm

This is a free session with activities and delivery aimed more at adults or young people of secondary school age

Again, this workshop is free and visitors are welcome to drop in. We recommend allowing an hour to work through activities but you are welcome to come for longer and spend more time handling, drawing and talking about the bones, skulls and shells we will have on display

Visitors are welcome to bring their own clean mystery finds with them – with no guarantee that we’ll be able to solve the mystery but have confidence that we will be enthusiastic about them!

Our wonderful friends in the community group Stone and Water have achieved a grant from BSW towards the community participation in these events and to cover the costs of a similar session with a youth group. In fact, we’ve got 2 – so a local WATCH group is going to be going all skeletal and what will happen to Taxal Scouts, I almost dread to think.

deeply involved

deeply involved

These events are supported by British Science Week and are also part of Buxton Museum’s Collections in the Landscape project

That drawing: australopithecus skulls, sheep skull, the bear in the corner of the gallery, some scared people…and a landrover…you can sort the story out yourself!

skulls, packed, a mug of tea and a stray chamaeleon bone...

skulls, packed, a mug of tea and a stray chamaeleon bone…

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Bone detectives!

BONE DETECTIVES

Discovering the secrets of the skulls

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We are very excited to announce some delightfully bony workshops happening in March. As part of British Science Week, we are working with Buxton Museum and Art Gallery and Creeping Toad to offer a series of events and workshops exploring skulls. Stone and Water was awarded a BSW grant to support these workshops.

BSW2016RGBMID_BBLUEHere are the clues that will help you identify the mysterious skull you found on the beach or the bones on the moor, or perhaps here is simply the skills to exercise a fascination with ancient remains, old bones and hidden histories. We will guide visitors through the wonders of animal teeth, and horn cores, the marvels of eye sockets and tympanic bullae. We’ll even introduce you to scroll bones and senses of smells

“There are so many bones in so many animals,” said Gordon from Creeping Toad, “that we had to focus on something. So we are starting with skulls, especially mammal skulls. We’d like to invite people to look more closely at the skulls of Peak District mammals ( I suspect some birds might sneak in as well, and possibly a selection of sea shells…) and understanding the signs to look for and the questions to ask that will help you find out what the animal is and something about its life”

For the Museum, this is part of the Collections in the Landscape project, aiming to both remind people about the museum and its collections but also to get people out there in the Peaks, looking, thinking and wondering about the history of the places we visit. There will be skulls to handle (we’ll supply gloves if you’d rather) and quality replicas if you really don’t want to touch the actual bone (it will all be clean!), other bones to look at, some shells for a bit of the exotic. We’ll hold and think, question, count and scribble. There will be useful guide sheets to take away and drawings to do to build up your own forensic notes. And we’ll do a mystery quiz at the end….

 

Events

Public event: Saturday  12th March 2016, Buxton Museum and Art Gallery : free public sessions: no booking needed just drop by and join in but give yourself 45 minutes for a good skeletal experience. Sessions 10 – 12 and 1 – 3

Youth group: we have one free workshop on offer for a group of young people in or around Buxton in the week of 12 – 20th March. Activity best suited for 8 – 12 year olds

A workshop introducing young people to exciting natural history forensics. If you are interested, please contact us at stoneandwater@btinternet.com

Venue and time: to suit you

Older group workshop: we will also be running a workshop with a limited number of places during the week. Date and time to follow. This will be a more formal session than the Saturday events, aimed at  young people and adults. Details to follow

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Peak District creatures? or not?

 

Summer events at Buxton Museum

Lively times at Buxton Museum

the excitements of Ice Age life: a visit from a wooly rhino!

the excitements of Ice Age life: a visit from a wooly rhino!

While these events aren’t being organised by Stone and Water, artists who lead our events are leading these ones so we thought you might like to join in!

 

All events

Venue:  Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Terrace Road, Buxton, SK17 6DA

 Times: 10am – 12noon

Booking: no booking necessary, just turn up and join in – but allow 45 minutes for making things

Costs: free events, just bring yourself and a cheerful grown-up if you are 7 years old or less

 

 Ice Age Life

Wednesday 29th July

Mammoths-10Step back in time with artist and storyteller Gordon from Creeping Toad and make your own model of Peak District life in a colder age. Inspired by mammoths and sabre-tooths, cave lions and reindeer we’ll make pop-up landscapes and the animals and people who lived here 10,000 years ago

 

 

Peg People of the Peaks

Wednesday 12th August

From elegant Victorian ladies to medieval villains, Norman knights to Robin Hood, all sorts of people have visited the Peaks. Artist Sarah Males will help you make your own characters, real or imaginary, nice or nasty, from the history of the Peaks

 

Lost tales of the Peaks

Wednesday 19th August

using photos of local buildings and places that feature in local stories, Gordon the Toad will tell old stories and help us invent new ones. From murder mysteries to wild romances, treasure hunts and terrible ghosts, we’ll spin new stories out of the hills, dales and buildings of the Peaks

what treasures will help us tell our stories

what treasures will help us tell our stories

Summer events and other excitements!

Leek: once again
New display and event moments

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Our Leek: once, now and next project has been a great success. From a “Birthday Party for a Lost Abbey” to far more sensible history talks, embroidery and appliqué sessions and a pop-up street from the lost years of Leek, project ideas and activities have engaged and excited visitors

Now we have a few last sessions and a few opportunities for some more….

Come and join us!

eventful times in Leek: once

eventful times in Leek: once

May 2015:
all month the spectacular Cope for a Lost Abbot will be on display in the foyer of The Green Man Gallery in Buxton (check out the Gallery’s website for opening times)*

23, 24, 25th May: our exhibition of work and activities from the project will join the Cope on display in the The Green Man Gallery. Beautiful photos reaching from Leek, once (ruins, memories, dreams) to Leek, now (visitors capturing their own ideas, participants working on projects) with opportunities for you to add your thoughts of Leek: next

Sunday 24th May: Princely Pennants and Princess Flags: 1 – 4pm, The Green Man Gallery: join us to design your own summer flag. Invent a Coat of Arms. Create monsters for brave knights and bold heroines. Add an image to our Wild Pennant. Free event: just drop by and join in but allow 30 minutes for your flagging. Children under 7, need to bring a grown-up with them. Materials provided. The mess you make yourself

once upon a time in the High Peak

once upon a time in the High Peak

Wednesday 27th May: The Lost Castles of Buxton; 10 -12, 1- 3, Buxton Museum. The Display will be up again in the museum and we’ll be inviting you to step back in time and make the house you think, hope, or worry, that you might have lived in when Dieulacres Abbey was at its height and Leek was the focal point for trade, travel and villainy across the Moorlands. Free event. No booking needed. Children under 7, need to bring a grown-up with them. Materials provided.

June 2015
Sunday 7th June: The Big Bird, Beast and Botany Hunt, Dove Valley Centre, 12 – 4 pm. Our display and our artists head back into the Staffordshire Moorlands for an afternoon at the delicious Dove Valley Centre. Tucked into the Upper Dove Valley, the Centre welcomes visitors to the start of summer with wildflower meadows, an orchard, explorations of river wildlife and a generally lovely afternoon. We’ll be there with summer flags and stories, encouraging you to capture summer on a fluttering pennant or brand a story-hero or adventure-horror on a flag for yourself

Would you like a session?
We have a bit of water here at the bottom of the well to offer other groups. If you  are interested in a session for your local group (Staffordshire Moorlands, High Peak, Derbyshire Dales), get in touch! We could come and do a lively “making” workshop, a careful sewing/applique/fabric painting session, tell stories or just talk to your group about what we have been doing.

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Email Gordon at creepingtoad@btinternet.com or call on 07791 096857

* The display (and especially the Cope) features work by groups from our project partners Borderland Voices so if you would like to see some BV achievements, here is another reason to come and visit us!

Leek: once, now and next is supported by:

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Ancient Landscapes: summer events

We have some exciting activities

taking place over the holiday period.

Come and join us exploring the ancient environments

that gave us the Peak District

The Longshaw Estate taken from high ground in the Peak District, Derbyshire

All events are free (car parking charges may apply in some places). Family events suitable for children from 4 years and over

You could also visit our main project blog for more details

 

Event summaries first then fuller details below

 

1. Tuesday 30th July: Life in ancient seas, at the Moorland Discovery centre, National Trust Longshaw nr Hathersage

– make your own prehistoric rockpool model! Sessions 11 – 1 and 2 -4, no booking needed

 

2. Thursday 1st August: Monsters from the Limestone, Buxton Museum and Art Gallery: SK17 6DA, making large puppet fossil animals from the depths of the ancient Peak District seas!, 10-30 -12.30, 1.30 – 3.30low- fossils 297

 

3. Tuesday 6th August: Winnat’s Pass Walk: exploring the millstone grits of the Dark Peak. Meet: Castleton Visitor Centre Car Park, S33 8WP, at 2pm. Walk 2 – 4pm, some steep slopes and off paved footpaths

 

4. Wednesday 7th August: Life in Ancient Seas at Leek Low-Ilam-179

Brough Park, Leek, 11 – 3: meet the Ancient Landscape team and make your own finger-puppet fossils or ancient seascape

 

Events in detail

1. Life in ancient seas

Date: Tuesday 30th July 2013

Venue: Moorland Discovery Centre, National Trust Longshaw, nr Hathersage

Times: 11 – 1 and 2 – 4

Booking: no booking needed just drop by and join in

Cost: free: materials provided (donations welcomed)- car parking charges may apply

 

What’s happening?

Come and paddle in a prehistoric sea! Explore life in the Carboniferous Seas of 300 million years ago that eventually gave us the limestone, shale and gritstones of the Peak District. We’ll look at fossils to understand the animals of the times, draw those animals and the corals and seaweeds they lived in. Then visitors can make their own model rockpool as a piece of ancient seaside to take home

 

Eurypterid 12. Monsters from the Limestone

Date: Thursday 1st August 2013

Venue: Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, terrace Rd, Buxton SK17 6DA

Times: 10.30 – 12.30 and 1.30 – 3.30

Booking: no booking needed just drop by and join in

Cost: free: materials provided (donations welcomed) – car parking charges may apply

Organisers and more information: this is part of the Ancient Landscapes project organised by Stone and Water (http://ancientlandscapes.blogspot.co.uk/).

 

What’s happening?

Exploring life in the Carboniferous Seas that eventually gave us the limestone, shale and gritstones of the Peak District. We’ll look at fossils to understand the animals of those times, and build our own limestone creatures as puppets and masks – make a pet trilobite, wear a giant brachiopod, or have a tame crinoid or nautiloid to ripple home with you….

Basic activity is straightforward with lots of options for people to experiment with

 

3. Winnat’s Pass WalkClose view of rock formations on the Longshaw Estate, near Wooden Pole, Derbyshire, in October.

Date: Tuesday 6th August 2013

Meeting point: Castleton Visitor Centre Car Park, Castleton, Hope Valley S33 8WP

Times: 2 – 4pm

Booking: no booking needed just drop by and join in

Cost: free: materials provided (donations welcomed) – car parking charges may apply

Organisers and more information: this is part of the Ancient Landscapes project organised by Stone and Water (http://ancientlandscapes.blogspot.co.uk/).

 

What’s happening?

With National Trust Rangers, we will explore the geology of this dramatic gorge, meeting the millstone grit that eventually covered the limestone of the White Peak. A Stone and Water will help the group explore creatively: drawing rocks and shapes, composing instant poems, making up wild stories about the cliffs and caves of the Pass.

This walk will last 2 hours, has some steep slopes and will not remain on paved surfaces. Strong footwear essential and clothing to suit the weather

 

4. Life in Ancient Seas at Leek PlayDay

Date: Wednesday 7th  August 2013

Venue: Brough Park, Leek (beside the Leek Leisure Centre)

Times: 11 – 3

Booking: no booking needed just drop by and join in

Cost: free: materials provided (donations welcomed) – car parking charges may apply

Organisers and more information: this is part of the Ancient Landscapes project organised by Stone and Water (http://ancientlandscapes.blogspot.co.uk/).

 

What’s happening?

Come and paddle in a prehistoric sea! Explore life in the Carboniferous Seas of 300 million years ago that eventually gave us the limestone, shale and gritstones of the Peak District. We’ll be making personal finger-puppet trilobites and pet ammonites and models of ancient seasides…

seaweed strip