TINY! Dragons, etc

TINY! DRAGONS, WYRMS AND SERPENTS

Sunday 17th July 2016

11am – 4pm

Pavilion Gardens, Buxton

find us near the younger children’s play area

Tiny-dragon
Another Tiny! event. Join us to fill the Gardens with dragons, medieval wyrms and wonderful serpents – none of them bigger than your hand (or maybe a wriggle as long as your arm). Stone and Water has been doing Tiny! days for several years now as part of Buxton Festival Fringe. There have been Tiny! Pirates (they send their regrets but they can’t join us this year as they are off plundering a garden pond somewhere (they are, after all, very small pirates)), fairies, goblins and trolls, knights and princesses, a lantern procession…

Join us under the trees to make your own Tiny! Creature: a cheerful, quiet, restful place within the wider activity of Pavilion Gardens. Step into a creative moment and find your own inner dragon – or outer Wyrm, or simply flappy monster….

When: 2 sessions: 11am – 1pm, 2pm – 4pm,  free: no booking, tickets or anything like that. Just turn up and join in

Where: Pavilion Gardens, Buxton

Fringe logo.18

 

 

REPORT ON THIS EVENT CAN BE FOUND HERE

a dragon soars across Pavilion Gardens, 17th July 2016

a dragon soars across Pavilion Gardens, 17th July 2016

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The end of the bones

Bone Detectives

for British Science Week

12th – 20th March 2016

Orbit-2

There were bones, and teeth, there were skulls and even the fragmented paw of a cave lion. And there was time to look, to handle , turn over, touch, test a fingertip against a crocodile’s tooth.

the buffalo skull was very popular

the buffalo skull was very popular

Time to talk, wonder, ask and ask again and say, “No!” and “What’s a hyrax?” and

“This is a porpoise?”

“Where is the elephant’s trunk?”

“Can I pick this up? Oh. Can I pick that up? Good”

 

There were beautiful replica skulls for the slightly squeamish and gloves for the bolder – or for anyone who just wanted to look sort-of-scientific like they were on some police procedural drama

Skulls- long

For British Science Week, in a collaboration between Stone and Water, Buxton Museum’s Collections in the Landscape project and Creeping Toad, we ran a series of “Bone Detectives” workshops. These set out to introduce people to some basic skull features to look for and understand the clues they can give us about the original animal. The thought was that this would encourage people to look – to really open their eyes when they are out or maybe even to set off and do the hopeful walk they wouldn’t have done before

 

Skulls, skeletons or bits often turn up on walks over the moors of the Peak District, or perhaps are found by someone strolling in a casually acquisitive manner along a beach. We were looking for the questions (and their answers) that would set some inspired investigation in motion. We concentrated mostly on British mammal skulls – given time and the scope of vertebrate anatomy we had to draw some lines somewhere. But there were extension opportunities and as confidence grew, participants could move onto British bird skulls, a few exotic extras – a crocodile, assorted horns, replica hyrax, lynx and wallaby and a wide selection of shells including a spread of annoying cone shells (this one? That one? No, the other one? Why would you call something a geographical cone, for goodness sake”. There was even a d-i-y snake spine

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The workshops were a delight: from keenly questioning WATCH members to the surprise of casual visitors, workshops invite participation and challenged preconceptions. “But it’s so small! “ (same comment applied to rabbit, rat and squirrel skulls). People brought their own puzzles with them: beautfully delicate mouse and hedgehog skulls, a mysterious jaw bone (probably sheep), the museum added some mind-boggling teeth: woolly rhino and hyena.

 

The very bold in the museum went off to find the cave bear skull

Low Cave bear 2

We were pleased: these were sessions that maybe didn’t get quite the quiet, dedicated concentration we had imagined but they were sessions that got people handling material, talking, asking questions, feeling more confident.

 

Sources:

Just to be clear, the skulls and shells we sued were all found materials or were already in established collections. Nothing was killed for the sake of this project

 

Reproduction skulls came from a wonderful online shop: CrimsonRichDesire

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Bone Detectives, 1

Bone Detectives 1

The secrets of the skulls

Buxton Museum and Art gallery, 12th March 2016

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There were skulls, and some more skulls, and a Victorian Engineer’s cabinet of little bits of things and a decoupage box of seashells and then a box of mystery skulls….There was laughter and drawing and attempts to have big sisters/little brothers eaten…and there is more to come

a shell that went round and round, and the drawing that did the same

a shell that went round and round, and the drawing that did the same

see the foot of the page...

see the foot of the page…

the buffalo skull was very popular

the buffalo skull was very popular

Wednesday 16th March: Bone Detectives, 2:at Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Terrace Rd, Buxton, SK17 6DA, Tel: 01629 533540. 1 session: 10am – 1pm

This is a free session with activities and delivery aimed more at adults or young people of secondary school age

Again, this workshop is free and visitors are welcome to drop in. We recommend allowing an hour to work through activities but you are welcome to come for longer and spend more time handling, drawing and talking about the bones, skulls and shells we will have on display

Visitors are welcome to bring their own clean mystery finds with them – with no guarantee that we’ll be able to solve the mystery but have confidence that we will be enthusiastic about them!

Our wonderful friends in the community group Stone and Water have achieved a grant from BSW towards the community participation in these events and to cover the costs of a similar session with a youth group. In fact, we’ve got 2 – so a local WATCH group is going to be going all skeletal and what will happen to Taxal Scouts, I almost dread to think.

deeply involved

deeply involved

These events are supported by British Science Week and are also part of Buxton Museum’s Collections in the Landscape project

That drawing: australopithecus skulls, sheep skull, the bear in the corner of the gallery, some scared people…and a landrover…you can sort the story out yourself!

skulls, packed, a mug of tea and a stray chamaeleon bone...

skulls, packed, a mug of tea and a stray chamaeleon bone…

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Bone Detectives

Skulls- long

we have now finalised events for our Bone Detectives events in British Science Week

Discovering the secrets of the skulls

Here are the clues that will help you identify the mysterious skull you found on the beach or the bones on the moor, or perhaps here is simply the skills to exercise a fascination with ancient remains, old bones and hidden histories

When we examine a skull, we can tell a lot of an animal’s story: diet, behaviour, age, senses: the clues are all there for the skilled osteologist to read

These workshops will introduce participants to some of those skills, offering activities and inviting questions, setting an investigative procedure in motion so that even if we know what the animal is, we can still find out more

 Materials:

there will be skulls to handle, gloves to wear (for the wary), plastic skulls as back-up, paper to draw on, pencils, etc to draw with information sheets to work with and keep

Lynx skullPUBLIC EVENTS

Saturday 12th March: Bone Detectives, 1: at Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Terrace Rd, Buxton, SK17 6DA, Tel: 01629 533540. Sessions 10 – 12, 1 – 3

Free, no booking needed, children 7 years and under need to bring an adult and squeamish adults probably need to be accompanied too

These sessions are aimed at family groups

Wednesday 16th March: Bone Detectives, 2:at Buxton Museum and Art Gallery, Terrace Rd, Buxton, SK17 6DA, Tel: 01629 533540. 1 session: 10am – 1pm

This is a free session with activities and delivery aimed more at adults or young people of secondary school age

Again, this workshop is free and visitors are welcome to drop in. We recommend allowing an hour to work through activities but you are welcome to come for longer and spend more time handling, drawing and talking about the bones, skulls and shells we will have on display

Visitors are welcome to bring their own clean mystery finds with them – with no guarantee that we’ll be able to solve the mystery but have confidence that we will be enthusiastic about them!

These events are supported by British Science Week and are also part of Buxton Museum’s Collections in the Landscape project

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Bone detectives!

BONE DETECTIVES

Discovering the secrets of the skulls

Orbit-2 copy

We are very excited to announce some delightfully bony workshops happening in March. As part of British Science Week, we are working with Buxton Museum and Art Gallery and Creeping Toad to offer a series of events and workshops exploring skulls. Stone and Water was awarded a BSW grant to support these workshops.

BSW2016RGBMID_BBLUEHere are the clues that will help you identify the mysterious skull you found on the beach or the bones on the moor, or perhaps here is simply the skills to exercise a fascination with ancient remains, old bones and hidden histories. We will guide visitors through the wonders of animal teeth, and horn cores, the marvels of eye sockets and tympanic bullae. We’ll even introduce you to scroll bones and senses of smells

“There are so many bones in so many animals,” said Gordon from Creeping Toad, “that we had to focus on something. So we are starting with skulls, especially mammal skulls. We’d like to invite people to look more closely at the skulls of Peak District mammals ( I suspect some birds might sneak in as well, and possibly a selection of sea shells…) and understanding the signs to look for and the questions to ask that will help you find out what the animal is and something about its life”

For the Museum, this is part of the Collections in the Landscape project, aiming to both remind people about the museum and its collections but also to get people out there in the Peaks, looking, thinking and wondering about the history of the places we visit. There will be skulls to handle (we’ll supply gloves if you’d rather) and quality replicas if you really don’t want to touch the actual bone (it will all be clean!), other bones to look at, some shells for a bit of the exotic. We’ll hold and think, question, count and scribble. There will be useful guide sheets to take away and drawings to do to build up your own forensic notes. And we’ll do a mystery quiz at the end….

 

Events

Public event: Saturday  12th March 2016, Buxton Museum and Art Gallery : free public sessions: no booking needed just drop by and join in but give yourself 45 minutes for a good skeletal experience. Sessions 10 – 12 and 1 – 3

Youth group: we have one free workshop on offer for a group of young people in or around Buxton in the week of 12 – 20th March. Activity best suited for 8 – 12 year olds

A workshop introducing young people to exciting natural history forensics. If you are interested, please contact us at stoneandwater@btinternet.com

Venue and time: to suit you

Older group workshop: we will also be running a workshop with a limited number of places during the week. Date and time to follow. This will be a more formal session than the Saturday events, aimed at  young people and adults. Details to follow

Skulls 714 copy

Peak District creatures? or not?

 

Well-wooded Words – a book for Christmas?

Well-wooded Words

a book for Christmas?

Poetry trail booklet (low)

Are you planning for presents?
Why not add a touch of something leafy?

With 30 poems from 17 poets “Well-wooded words” takes its readers (and listeners – try reading these aloud to friends, loved ones and people who really don’t like you) from the wide moors of the high hills, over the craggy rocks of the edges, into the clear water of limestone streams and into the underground darkness of water-worn caves….

This collection contains poems from the first Grinlow Poetry Trail (2015), nominated for “excellence in spoken word” as part of Buxton Festival Fringe with our poets offering poems that

share your enjoyment, your passions, your delights and your despairs of, from or about the Peaks

Here, you can find poems that celebrate the ordinary and the everyday…
Grinlow woods
This morning, I am stepping
through my door
to walk around this town
on streets new with downpour.
I want to follow my feet;
to feel pavements rise and fall
around corners, between storeys,
by dripping gates and garden walls.

(from Buxton Rain by Karey Lucas-Hughes)

Grinlow 1…that turn everyday encounters into challenges…

So which one of you double dared me?
I’m no spring chicken but you don’t scare me.
Just you wait. You’ll see.
Do you think I’m afraid?
Of some hairy leaved weed?
(from Nettled by Linda Goulden)

…and that touch the beauty of the moors under the high clouds…

Peat pulses in my veins.


Stone stirs, settles in my bones.


The wide, wild moor 
stretches over my skin,


caressing,


whispering of another life.
(from The wide, wild moor by Angie Pearson)

We have a few copies left. Priced at £4.00 (includes P&P unless it’s going overseas – ask for details)

Cheques to “Stone and Water”
Available from: Stone and Water 51-d West Road, Buxton, SK17 6HQ
Email: stoneandwater@btinternet.com
BACS/PayPal available

invite an adventure into the green

invite an adventure into the green

Words in the woods

Well-wooded Words

The Grinlow Poetry Trail

18th and 19th July 2015

Grinlow 1

most of the art doesn't need comment

most of the art doesn’t need comment

Running alongside the Grinlow Art and Storytelling Trail, we spilled words through the woods, threading poems between crocheted cups, very small peg-doll fairies, giant toadstools, occasional dinosaurs, paintings and people

 

There was something everywhere it seemed, under feet, over heads, ragged crows flying through the trees, a haiku shrubbery

 

We ran this first Poetry Trail separate from the Art and Storytelling Trail as we didn’t know if there would be enough interest in it to make a viable feature. There was. It did. It worked. Maybe next year we’ll knit the art, storytelling and DSCF3214poetry together even more closely. Most visitors didn’t separate one from the other and of course there were poems that were part of the art trail and storytellers who appeared in both….it’s too easy to ramble here so I’ll stop and paste in the Review of the Trail from the Festival Fringe below

 

And when you are feeling wildly inspired by all of this, you might like to get a copy of the Well-wooded words collection of poems. A modest £3.50 (includes P&P) from Stone and Water. Cheques to Stone and Water at 51-d West Road, Buxton, SK17 6HQ. Paypal is possible – drop us an email stoneandwater@btinternet.com and we’ll send you details

the booklet is actually a wonderful dark green....

the booklet is actually a wonderful dark green….

 

Grinlow Poetry Trail review

Derek1PTrailThe poetry trail was an enormous success. It was well attended with people taking a great interest in the poems as well as the art and the storytelling. It was enhanced greatly by the piano accordion player walking around and other musicians playing in the woods, which at first I heard from a distance. There was also a surprise performance of a choir at 1.30 pm singing four well known songs.

The art and poetry lived happily side by side. In one area there was a row of paintings showing mainly urban scenes each with a corresponding poem on the same subject. There was also a mushroom area with many poems about fairies not far away.

There was a great range of contributors, from people who wrote the occasional poem, to poets with more than a local reputation, through to the immortals like Shakespeare and Virgil.

The subjects included descriptions and feelings provoked by Grinlow Woods, works about the beauty and magic of woodlands, invitations to visit places nearby and poems about tragedies caused by drug-taking. Not all viewed nature as a source of joy. Some dwelt on less pleasant elements related to woodlands and nature such as trees fighting against the elements for survival.

One of my favourite sets of poems was written on large banners which were very eye-catching. The poems are about nature being in a constant state of flux and the poet’s thoughts became absorbed with the process. The poet tries to guess where the raindrops will fly and where they will rebound.

Another of my favourite poems dealt with a human relationship, making analogies with the progression of the seasons.

It all took place in a very beautiful environment with good weather which brought about much social interaction between the viewers.

Roger Horvath

Source: http://www.buxtonfringe.org.uk/reviews2015spo.html

 

Grinlow Art and Storytelling Trail review can be found here